Robert the Bruce’s bid for the Throne began 708 years ago

History, Scotland

Robert the Bruce’s journey to become King of Scots began 708 years ago in Dumfries, Scotland. In a meeting with his rival for the throne, John Comyn, in Dumfries’ Greyfriars monastery on the 10th February 1306, Bruce killed Comyn. It was this decisive moment in history that ensured that Bruce would go on to seize the throne, and he was crowned King of Scots the following month on the 25th March 1306.

Presently this is the only nod to the historic events leading to Bruce taking the throne that took place in Dumfries in 1306

Presently this is the only nod to the historic events leading to Bruce taking the throne that took place in Dumfries in 1306

The town of Dumfries has launched a campaign including major plans to recognise it’s links to Robert the Bruce, with an interactive visitor centre on the site where Bruce clashed with Comyn.  There could also be DNA testing on remains excavated in 1961 that are believed to be his defeated rival, if the current campaign is successful.

The killing of Cromyn by Bruce in Greyfriars monastery

The killing of Cromyn by Bruce in Greyfriars monastery

It is hoped that visitors around the world will come to Dumfries to visit the site steeped in history and it’s new visitor centre.

For more information visit the The Robert the Bruce Commemoration Trust

 


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